The Brown Ranch Community Development Plan

Designed by the community, for the community.

4. The Plan

4.1 Summary

4.2 Neighborhoods & Blocks

4.3 Mobility

4.4 Open Space

4.5 Project Economics & Stewardship

4.6 Next Steps

4.1 Summary

BUILDING FOR A HEALTHY, EQUITABLE, SUSTAINABLE & RESILIENT FUTURE

The development plan for Brown Ranch takes lessons from the past and uses a health equity lens to build social and environmental sustainability to serve generations to come.

THE OLD TOWN MODEL

Old Town Steamboat Springs is beloved by all, and for good reason. It is a mixed-income, mixed-use neighborhood that evolved over many years. Its gridded street network provides a flexible urban framework that can adapt as community needs change. Development is relatively compact, minimizing the land used and
infrastructure needed, and responds to the natural landscape with setbacks from riparian corridors and a growth boundary that follows the topography. It’s connected to the broader Steamboat area by a robust network of trails and transit. The result is a diverse, walkable neighborhood rich in community amenities and services, in close proximity to the mountain landscape that draws people to the area.

BROWN RANCH URBAN DESIGN VISION

While Old Town can’t be replicated, it can serve as a model for how we approach development at Brown Ranch. At 534 acres, Brown Ranch is the last significant land area within the Urban Growth Boundary. Creating a Community Development Plan at this scale that responds to the community’s current social, cultural,
and economic needs, and utilizes sustainable infrastructure has the potential to foster a vibrant local community for generations to come.

The development plan for Brown Ranch contained in this document grows from the vision established by the local community. It takes lessons from the past while building a better future. It uses a health equity lens to create an active, safe, resilient place to live, work, and play, fostered by social and environmental  sustainability.

SITE CONTEXT

The Brown Ranch is the largest developable site within the Steamboat Springs Urban Growth Boundary. In addition to addressing the housing supply and affordability crisis, the site holds potential to provide much needed amenities and services to West Steamboat.

The Urban Growth Boundary was established in 1993 as part of the Steamboat Springs Area Master Plan. The boundary allows for growth while preserving the surrounding natural landscape that helps define the character of Steamboat Springs. The mountain valley character dominates the experience at Brown Ranch, with views to the mountainscape from almost every place on the site.

Brown Ranch is located three miles west of Old Town Steamboat and six miles west of the ski resort in an area known as West Steamboat. Several housing developments have been built in the West Steamboat area over the past 50 years (Steamboat II, Silver Spur, and Heritage Park), and while there are some services and restaurant options, residents drive into Old Town or the Ski Base area for most of their daily needs.

Development at Brown Ranch has the potential not only to address the critical housing supply and affordability challenges faced by locals, but also to stitch together the disparate neighborhoods in West Steamboat by providing services not currently available and creating spaces for community gathering.

SITE FEATURES

The Brown Ranch site features and immediate context, both natural and constructed, will inform the approach to development on the site.

The Brown Ranch site is easily accessed by US Highway 40 to the south and County Road 42 to the west. The Overlook Subdivision to the east is in the process of constructing three roadways that will connect Brown Ranch and Overlook. There is no current site access to the north, and constructing new access in this area would be a significant undertaking. Additionally, the northern portion of the site falls outside the Urban Growth Boundary.

Connections to the adjacent neighborhoods (Overlook, Sleepy Bear, and Silver Spur) will be important in stitching together the fabric of West Steamboat to create a connected, diverse community.

The site includes several unique features that shape its character, including the Slate Creek riparian corridor and a log barn that dates back to 1976.

The southwest corner of the site abuts a parcel currently owned by the Steamboat Springs School District. For the purposes of this Development Plan, the school parcel is seen as an extension of the Brown Ranch. A school to serve future needs will be identified within the combined site at a location that best serves the new community. Flexibility built into the plan will allow the school parcel to remain independent, should that best suit future needs.

Sun, Wind, & Average Weather

The Brown Ranch site experiences four distinct seasons, which influence the design and development of future housing and open spaces. Winter temperatures often stay below freezing, with significant snow accumulation. Summers are increasingly characterized by mild to moderate heat waves and limited precipitation.

The site experiences primary winds from the southeast and secondary winds from the southwest, and a marked difference in available daylight hours between summer and winter.

Solar access is good throughout the site. Air quality is historically good, but the region continues to contend with compromised air quality as wildfires and smoke  events increase.

Habitat

Existing development surrounds Brown Ranch on three sides: Overlook to the east, US Highway 40 to the south, and Silver Spur and the Sleeping Giant school to the west. To the north, the parcel is adjacent to more rural lands. The surrounding development context, as well as the site’s agricultural history, have influenced the current ecological habitats in the area.

The Yampa River corridor provides a nesting habitat for bald eagles, as well as a foraging area for great blue herons. Nesting sandhill cranes have been reported west of the site boundary, and a Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse lek has been referenced northwest of the site. Mule deer migration corridors occasionally cross the north end of the site, adjacent to or above the urban growth boundary.

SITE ANALYSIS

A. Brown Ranch Entrance View

Brown Ranch’s entrance off of Highway 40 immerses the visitor in the site’s character. At the southern edge of the site its main landscape types converge, with upland hills on the west, gently rolling hills to the east and the Slate Creek corridor in the middle. Upon entering the site, glimpses of Deer Mountain to the northwest and Copper Ridge to the northeast emerge.

B. Slate Creek Corridor View

Slate Creek corridor runs north to south along the full length of the site, providing a riparian drainage that changes with the seasons. Looking towards the south along the creek corridor, Emerald Mountain rises in the distance, beyond Sleepy Bear Mobile Home Park.

C. Log Barn View

Resting above the Slate Creek Corridor, the Log Barn connects back to Brown Ranch’s historic use and serves as a focal point for potential community uses on site. Looking from the Log Barn to the southeast, the Steamboat Ski Area and the extensive Routt National Forest rise beyond the site’s adjacent hillsides.

D. West Neighborhood View

The west area of the Brown Ranch includes gently rolling hills that traverse down along Routt County Road 42, with sweeping views of the Yampa River Valley and Emerald Mountain beyond. This section of the site connects to the adjacent Silver Spur neighborhood and sits near the Sleeping Giant School.

BUILDABLE AREAS ANALYSIS

Brown Ranch’s entrance off of Highway 40 immerses the visitor in the site’s character. At the southern edge of the site its main landscape types converge, with upland hills on the west, gently rolling hills to the east and the Slate Creek corridor in the middle. Upon entering the site, glimpses of Deer Mountain to the northwest and Copper Ridge to the northeast emerge.

This analysis was based on the latest publicly available GIS 2022 data at the city, county, and state levels. The consultant team worked with local planning authorities as well as Colorado Parks and Wildlife to gather relevant jurisdictional and habitat data that could influence the location and size of the developable areas on site.

HOUSING CHOICES & COMMUNITY SPACES

The proposed program is designed to create a diverse, vibrant, and walkable neighborhood that meets the needs of the Steamboat Springs workforce by providing housing, commercial & community services, and high-quality parks and open space.

HOUSING CHOICES

The consultant team developed the proposed program based on RCLCO’s Housing Demand Study as well as the principles from Focus Team conversations.

The following factors shaped the team’s approach to the proposed housing choices:

There is a demand for 1,400 units on-site today, and a total 2,264 by 2040.
There is significant interest in home ownership. Downpayment assistance programs can help support that interest for some, but making Brown Ranch affordable and attainable to the workforce will rely in large part on affordable rental opportunities.
The first phase should be large enough to offset initial infrastructure costs, but needs to fit within the available water capacity.

Balancing housing and infrastructure costs with affordability targets and anticipated subsidy opportunities, the Plan proposes a mix of housing types including multi-family apartment and condominium buildings of various sizes, single-family attached homes (SFA: townhouses, duplex/fourplex/ sixplex, etc.) and some single family detached homes (SFD). While there was significant community interest in single-family homes, this housing type uses the most land area, requires the most subsidy, and serves the least number of people. YVHA ultimately decided on an overall housing mix of 65.5% apartments and condominiums, 21.5%
SFA, and 13% SFD, with 57.5% renter-occupied and 42.5% owner-occupied.

The breakdown by housing type and ownership is described in the pie chart below.

COMMUNITY SPACES

The proposed non-residential areas use the Housing Demand Study as a starting point, and adjust as needed to reflect the vision and priorities estabilished by the Brown Ranch Steering Committee and broader community.

The following factors shaped the team’s approach to the proposed commercial and community services:

There is currently enough demand to support a small commercial center in Phase I, including a small-format grocer and supporting retail.
Some additional commercial space may be provided in later phases but should be tied to demand created by Brown Ranch residents only.
Commercial and community space within Brown Ranch are critical to meeting the larger goals of creating a walkable neighborhood, fostering community, and reducing reliance on cars. The specific community and commercial uses are tied to the trip reduction assumptions in the traffic study and any changes to these nonresidential assumptions should be evaluated as part of the Transportation Demand Management plan.
Community and commercial uses should be distributed throughout the site, with a “village core” in each neighborhood to ensure easy access to amenities and
services for all residents.
Early conversations with the School District suggest that there will be a need for a future school in the area. An elementary school positioned near the center of the site could serve multiple community program needs, and reinforces the walkability of the Brown Ranch.

The breakdown of commercial and community services are described in the pie chart below.

AFFORDABILITY AT BROWN RANCH

The Yampa Valley Housing Authority is uniquely positioned in Steamboat Springs to deliver immediate and long-term affordability.

In Steamboat Springs, finding affordable housing at nearly all income levels is a challenge. The Community Development Plan calls for homes up to 258% AMI to capture residents in a range of income categories.

The Housing Demand Study examines housing need for the Steamboat Springs workforce by income group. There are three income categories used to define the affordability needs of the community, including:

• Low-Income: This group captures people earning 60% AMI or less, ($44,000 for a single-person household in 2022) per year. Some teachers, cashiers, and hospitality workers fall into this category.

• Entry Level: Sometimes thought of as “middle income,” this categy consists of households earning a combined 60-125% AMI, or $44,000-$92,000 per year.  Most police officers and other City employees fall into this category.

• Move-Up: Households earning a combined 125-250% AMI, or $92,000- $183,000 per year fall into this category. Doctors are one example of people in this  category. Many in this group are existing renters who would like to own a home and stay in the community, or are people being recruited to professional  positions at local businesses.

Because “affordable and attainable” housing is the number one priority of the community, the project team has directly aligned the proposed housing choices the Housing Demand Study results. The chart below represents the percentage of homes targeted for each income group.

The proposed affordability levels are not feasible in a typical market-rate development project. Construction of a single family home is only affordable to those earning more than 260% of AMI and above, while a townhouse is only affordable to those at 140% of AMI and above. Even a small apartment or condo is
only affordable to households at 75% AMI and above. A short construction season, labor shortages, high material costs and the cost to finance the project all factor into the problem. Meeting the affordability levels of the Steamboat Springs workforce requires leveraging local, state and federal programs. YHVA has experience leveraging these varying funding streams and designing efficient development projects in order to bring housing into an affordable range for the income groups listed. At Brown Ranch, housing costs for residents will be offset by the land donation, infrastructure subsidies, federal and state programs, and philanthropic dollars. YVHA’s track record of delivering successful projects in Steamboat Springs is critical to achieving the community’s goals of affordable and attainable housing at Brown Ranch.

In addition to these resources, the proposed design facilitates affordability through compact, walkable development, efficient infrastructure planning, and housing types that benefit from a range of shared amenities, both indoor and outdoor.

HOUSING & COMMUNITY SPACES DETAILS

The following tables represent the specific program used to inform the Site Plan. While the plan is designed as a flexible system to respond to changing needs over time, these tables reflect the data that was used to calculate the land area needed for this specific program.

The program is broken out by “phase” to align with the demand study information suggesting that a large “Phase 1” is needed both to meet need and to offset initial infrastructure costs. See page 95 for a description of the relationship between the “phases” and the neighborhoods shown in the Site Plan.

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN GUIDEPOSTS AND STRATEGIES

Bringing together what we heard from the entire community—Steering Committee vision and guiding principles, Focus Team principles, targeted outreach to traditionally unheard voices, and consultant team research and recommendation—these guideposts and strategies directly shape the physical design of the  project.

INCLUSIVE AND EQUITABLE COMMUNITY

Supporting housing choices for all, serving the highest need, and creating accessible community resources and gathering places:

Design blocks with lot size flexibility to accommodate multiple types of housing.
Locate highest density blocks with active ground floor uses in greatest proximity to amenities and transit.
Provide direct access to resources and open space amenities through greenway and trail network.
Distribute housing types equitably throughout the neighborhoods, with a mix of Multi-Family, Single-Family Attached, and Single-Family Detached with  Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) on every block.

WALKABLE, BIKEABLE, AND TRANSIT FIRST COMMUNITY

Supporting healthy, active lifestyles, connected communities, and a low carbon future:

Create a redundant, gridded mobility network with multiple options.
Minimize parking and create alleyaccessed parking with ADUs above.
Minimize vehicle lane widths for slower speeds and include bike lanes on all minor streets.
Limit through traffic to a single road.
Aggregate surface parking into parcels that can transition to housing in the future.
Design greenways for north-south connections to the core trail and community resources.

SAFE AND RESILIENT COMMUNITY

Responding to climate, safety, and health:

Orient blocks north/south to maximize solar exposure and opportunity for solar energy generation.
Use open space and greenway network to capture and manage stormwater and create and restore habitats.
Edge open spaces with service accessible trails and roads to maximize fire resilience.

CONTEXT CONNECTED

Rooted in the site, surrounding nature and the greater Steamboat Springs community:

Villages respond to special places on the site – Slate Creek, key viewsheds, and drainages.
Prioritize the multimodal trail connections throughout the site.
Create visual connections to the landscape beyond the site.
Use alleys to support old town character and maximize efficiency.
Promote arts and culture integration throughout the community.

BIG MOVES:

COMMUNITY-CENTERED ORGANIZING DESIGN CONCEPTS

USE SLATE CREEK AND THE MULTIMODAL TRAIL AS THE BACKBONE OF BROWN RANCH

The north-south Slate Creek corridor acts as the primary pedestrian and open space backbone to the Brown Ranch development. Neighborhood cores lead to this green spine, and primary public open spaces within it are stitched together by pedestrian trails through restored riparian zones, organizing the north-south connections on site.

FORM DEVELOPMENT AREAS TO RESPOND TO SITE CHARACTER, TOPOGRAPHY, AND VIEWS

Block shapes and locations react to the unique site topography, character, and views. Beyond avoiding steep slopes, each neighborhood embraces its unique
location, whether surrounded by flattops, nestled adjacent to the riparian corridors or perched within upland hills. East-west views towards the ski mountain and northsouth views towards Emerald Mountain are reinforced by the neighborhood grid orientation.

DESIGN A WIDE VARIETY OF HOUSING TYPES, EQUITABLY MIXED THROUGHOUT THE DEVELOPMENT

Each block throughout the development contains an equitable mix of housing types. Mixing a wide variety of housing types throughout the site creates a compact, diverse, and walkable neighborhood that can meet the urgent housing demand and critical health equity goals.

CREATE A HEART IN EVERY NEIGHBORHOOD: VIBRANT MIX OF USES AND GATHERING

Each neighborhood region has a central “heart,” with an active mixed-use zone that includes community spaces, retail, live-work units, and services, with housing above. Each of these neighborhood cores have access to transit and are along streets that lead directly to larger community parks and open space.

FOLLOW A “GRIDS AND GREENWAYS” MOBILITY NETWORK

The site plan follows a specific grid pattern to allow for increased mobility and redundancy for pedestrians and cars. The grid pattern allows for smaller, safer streets while creating easier access and a better pedestrian experience. Alternating roads and greenways allow a maximum number of units to front public open space and connect to the broader trail network.

MAXIMIZE SUSTAINABLE DESIGN OPPORTUNITIES

The plan creates sustainable design opportunities across scales. Block orientation and parcel layout maximize solar access, capture prevailing breezes for passive
ventilation opportunities, and prioritize shading to mitigate heat. Greenways and open spaces encourage sustainable transit while facilitating storm water  strategies, and building and open space principles limit resource use.

SITE PLAN

The Brown Ranch site plan consists of four distinct neighborhoods, shaped by the unique site topography.

A gridded system of streets and greenways connects each residential block. Each neighborhood has a core zone that includes a transit stop, mixed-use retail,  services, and community gathering spaces. Parks, open spaces and trails weave each neighborhood together and connect to the greater Steamboat Springs community.

Circulation & Open Space Diagrams

Open Space & Pedestrian Network

The landscape concept builds from the natural characteristics of the site to provide outdoor places for enjoyment, habitat, and various ecologies. The landscape within Brown Ranch provides parks for recreation, open spaces that retain the natural character of the land with a focus on wildlife and native plantings, and
spaces for water collection and conveyance.

The bike and pedestrian network for Brown Ranch is robust and is intended to prioritize safe, convenient, and well-maintained biking and walking opportunities appropriate for all ages and ability levels.

Circulation & Street Typologies

The Brown Ranch street network is designed to prioritize safe pedestrian and bicycle circulation over vehicle convenience through the site. The proposed street hierarchy relies on multiple smaller streets at slower speeds to accommodate traffic rather than arterials that allow for faster vehicle traffic. This grid of smaller streets creates redundancy in the system, providing multiple options for emergency vehicles while limiting traffic volumes on any one street.

NEIGHBORHOODS

Each neighborhood contains a minimum capacity based on a specific mix of housing types, but provides the flexibility for additional homes if needed in the future. The potential range of units for each neighborhood is listed below.

TOTAL POTENTIAL DEVELOPABLE AREA ON SITE, IN BLOCKS: 82*

*A representative block area equals 74,470 square feet or 1.7 acres, and only includes the private parcel area (excluding public right of ways, sidewalks, streets, and alleys).

The blocks shaded in blue, light purple, and dark purple represent the parcel areas that are needed in order meet the development plan (number of units, types of housing, non-residential areas and parking) and provide housing choices.

The white shaded blocks indicate areas that could be developed if needed to accommodate potential changes to the development plan. Factors that could lead to changes in the development plan include: detailed geotechnical, wildfire, grading, and feasibility analysis, or changes in the roadway widths, typical block sizes, or parcel sizes.

NEIGHBORHOOD A – 9 BLOCKS 400 – 480 UNITS
NEIGHBORHOOD B – 10 BLOCKS 330 – 360 UNITS
NEIGHBORHOOD C – 25 BLOCKS 1040 – 1070 UNITS
NEIGHBORHOOD D – 12 BLOCKS 480 – 510 UNITS

POTENTIAL SCHOOL SITE: 3 BLOCKS

A ~200,000 SF site for a school and associated program will be held in either Neighborhood C or D.

LAND USE BALANCE

Parks, open space, and the area outside the urban growth boundary account for the majority of the land area in the proposed plan. About 40% or less of the available land will be developed for neighborhoods and roads.

A. BALANCE FOR BLOCKS NEEDED TO FULFILL RESIDENTIAL DEMAND AND NON-RESIDENTIAL USES AT SUGGESTED DENSITIES

Diagram A shows the land use breakdown if Brown Ranch develops only the blocks needed to fulfill the residential and non-residential demand at the recommended densities. In this scenario, neighborhoods and roads account for 30% of the total acreage and open space within the UGB is 40% of the total area. Parks and area outside of the UGB account for 10% and 20% of the acreage breakdown, respectively.

B. BALANCE FOR TOTAL POTENTIAL BLOCKS

Diagram B shows the land use breakdown if Brown Ranch were to develop all of the potential blocks shown in the site plan diagram. It should be noted that this scenario shows more developed area than needed if neighborhoods adhere to the recommended density mixes. In this scenario, neighborhoods and roads account for 41% of the total acreage and open space within the urban growth boundary (UGB) is 29% of the total area. Parks and area outside of the UGB are unchanged from scenario A.

AERIAL VIEW & RENDERINGS

AERIAL VIEW

NEIGHBORHOOD A VIEW

NEIGHBORHOOD B VIEW

NEIGHBORHOOD C VIEW

NEIGHBORHOOD D VIEW

4.2 Neighborhoods & Blocks

NEIGHBORHOOD & BLOCK PRINCIPLES

AN EQUITABLE MIX

Each neighborhood includes a neighborhood heart with commercial and community amenities, a mix of housing types, access to transit, and access to trails
and open space.
Each block has a specific mix of housing types, with minimums for each established by block type.
Highest density blocks are located in closest proximity to amenities and transit.

CONNECTED TO CONTEXT

Neighborhoods are distinct areas on site, defined by topography and site context.
The north-south oriented blocks allow for optimal solar photovoltaic potential, urban heat reduction, and utilization of prevailing winds.
Neighborhood design maximizes the number of units fronting greenspace and open space.

FUTURE FLEXIBILITY

Blocks are designed with lot size flexibility to accommodate multiple types of housing.
Aggregate surface parking into larger lots that can accommodate solar panels and potentially be redeveloped in the future.
Neighborhoods are designed with flexible “extra” blocks that may or may not be developed. These blocks are not required to meet the program demand as outlined, but may be needed as more site, geotechical, or design-related data is gathered.

HUMAN-CENTRIC

Utilize alleys for parking, emergency vehicle access (EVA), and ADU access to maximize neighborhood character of buildings fronting greenways and small
streets, minimizing heat islands and creating pedestrian-friendly experiences.
Create a robust network of seasonal midblock paths connected to wider pedestrian systems and bikeways, linking open spaces and trails to foster a connected and healthy community.

View of a Neighborhood Core and “Lincoln” blocks

Each pocket of development will include a vibrant Neighborhood Core with transit access, community services, gathering spaces, and mixed-use buildings (housing above ground floor commercial). These provide places for connection and welcome the broader Steamboat Springs community into Brown Ranch.

View of a greenway & “Oak” blocks

Greenways replace every other north-south oriented street, prioritizing pedestrians and cyclists over cars. Homes fronting the greenways enjoy a park-like experience, reducing reliance on private back yards. This strategy reduces paving, which improves stormwater conditions and minimizes heat islands. The greenways can be designed with features like community gardens, play structures, and basketball hoops or left as flexible open space for block parties and other gatherings.

View of a neighborhood street and “Pine” blocks

A typical neighborhood street will have a character similar to Pine Street in Old Town Steamboat with its narrow, tree-lined right-of-way and mix of housing types. Unlike Pine Street the typical street at Brown Ranch will include sidewalks and smaller front setbacks. “Pine” blocks will be lined with front porches and stoops to enhance community mobility and connectivity.

HOUSING MIX OVERVIEW

A mix of densities throughout the site and a mix of housing types on each block support the goal to create a welcoming, healthy, and equitable community. The
Plan includes three block typologies that are applied throughout the development.

THE FOLLOWING DEVELOPMENT MIXES ALIGN WITH THE TOTAL NUMBER AND TYPE OF UNITS PROPOSED IN THE PLAN. DISTRIBUTION OF EACH OF THE BLOCK TYPES ACROSS EACH NEIGHBORHOOD CREATES COMPACT, WALKABLE COMMUNITY WITH AN INTENTIONAL, EQUITABLE  APPROACH TOWARDS DENSITY

PINE

(lowest # of homes per block)

“PINE” BLOCK MIX

Pine blocks have the following unit type mix  ranges, consisting of a larger share of single family detached with ADUs, a medium amount of single-family attached, and smaller portion of multifamily developments:

SFD 55 – 65%
SFA 20 – 30%
MF 10 – 20%

“PINE” BLOCK TOTALS

To fulfill the demand and program there are the equivalent of 16 TOTAL PINE BLOCKS on site (14.5 residential blocks with a 1:1 parking ratio, plus 1.5 district parking blocks).

OAK

(moderate # of homes per block)

“OAK” BLOCK MIX

Oak blocks have the following unit type mix ranges, consisting of roughly equal amounts of each housing type:

SFD 25 – 35%
SFA 30 – 40%
MF 30 – 40%

“OAK” BLOCK TOTALS

To fulfill the demand and program there are the equivalent of 16 TOTAL OAK BLOCKS on site (14 residential blocks with a 1:1 parking ratio, plus 2 district parking blocks).

LINCOLN

(highest # of homes per block)

“LINCOLN” BLOCK MIX

Lincoln blocks are largely dedicated to multifamily developments, with the remaining area consisting of single-family detached units and a smaller amount of  single-family attached:

SFD 5 – 15%
SFA 35 – 45%
MF 45 – 55%

“LINCOLN” BLOCK TOTALS

To fulfill the demand and program there are the equivalent of 15 TOTAL LINCOLN BLOCKS on site (12.5 residential blocks with a 1:1 parking ratio, plus 2.5 district parking blocks).

NEIGHBORHOODS

Each neighborhood contains a minimum capacity based on a specific mix of housing types, but provides the flexibility for additional homes if needed in the future. The potential range of units for each neighborhood is listed below.

TOTAL POTENTIAL DEVELOPABLE AREA ON SITE, IN BLOCKS: 82*

*A representative block area equals 74,470 square feet or 1.7 acres, and only includes the private parcel area (excluding public right of ways, sidewalks, streets, and alleys). The blocks shaded in blue, light purple, and dark purple represent the parcel areas that are needed in order meet the development plan (number of units, types of housing, non-residential areas and parking) and provide housing choices. The white shaded blocks indicate areas that could be developed if
needed to accommodate potential changes to the development plan. Factors that could lead to changes in the development plan include: detailed geotechnical, wildfire, grading, and feasibility analysis, or changes in the roadway widths, typical block sizes, or parcel sizes.

NEIGHBORHOOD A: 9 BLOCKS, 400 – 480 UNITS

NEIGHBORHOOD B: 10 BLOCKS, 330 – 360 UNITS

NEIGHBORHOOD C: 25 BLOCKS, 1040 – 1070 UNITS

NEIGHBORHOOD D: 12 BLOCKS, 480 – 510 UNITS

POTENTIAL SCHOOL SITE: 3 BLOCKS

A ~200,000 SF site for a school and associated program will be held in either Neighborhood C or D.

NEIGHBORHOOD “A” PLAN

Neighborhood A acts as the front door to Brown Ranch, nestled between two sets of flat top hills, adjacent to the Slate Creek corridor, and connected to the broader Steamboat Springs community.

Neighborhood A will be the first phase of development at Brown Ranch. This neighborhood will require the least amount of infrastructure due to its proximity to Highway 40 and relatively flat topography. It will provide much needed community amenities for both Brown Ranch residents and neighboring communities, including a park, a transit hub, an affordable food market, a childcare center, and other community-focused services. A significant portion of the homes in this neighborhood will serve households at 125% AMI and below, where the most urgent need is currently. Thre- and four-story mixed-use buildings (homes above ground floor commercial) will make up much of Neighborhood A, with single family attached homes (four or sixplexes) sitting on the eastern edge to taper down the scale as it approaches the Overlook Neighborhood.

NBH A Mix

Total Blocks: 8.5
Residential Blocks (1:1 Parking): 6
District Parking Blocks: 2
Potential SFD Blocks @ Overlook: 1
Fire Station Block: 0.5
Single Family Attached Units: 10-20
Multifamily Units: 400-450

Neighborhood A‘s design maximizes the number of housing units that can be delivered in closest proximity to existing road infrastructure, utility connections, and transit. The hilltop area at the very southeast of the site, shown with a gray shaded lot plat, needs further investigation but may be able to house a small number of single family detached units, connecting directly to the Overlook development and infrastructure.

NEIGHBORHOOD “A”

Neighborhood A sets the tone for Brown Ranch’s pedestrian-focused, walkable neighborhoods.

The neighborhood includes a vibrant community core with mostly mixed-use buildings that contain commercial or community amenities on the ground floor and housing above. A centrally-located transit hub serves the neighborhood and the surrounding Overlook and Sleepy Bear developments. A village square and a park create amenities for locals within this core zone, with trail connections out to the greater site. To fulfill the development goals and meet demand at the density mixes shown, Neighborhood A contains 400-450 total units.

NEIGHBORHOOD “B” PLAN

Neighborhood B is tucked between the eastern edge of Slate Creek and a series of flat top hills at the edge of the Brown Ranch site.

The neighborhood includes a small community core with one residential mixed-use Lincoln block, two Oak blocks, and seven Pine blocks. A centrally located
transit stop serves the neighborhood, located adjacent to the small mixed-use zone. The neighborhood is surrounded by a perimeter trail that connects directly across the Slate Creek corridor to the community park on the western edge. To reach the planned development goals and meet demand at the density mixes shown, Neighborhood B contains about 350 total units.

PINE

Total Blocks: 7
Residential Blocks (1:1 Parking): 6.3
District Parking Blocks: 0.7
Single Family Detached Units: 75-85
Single Family Attached Units: 50-60
Multifamily Units: 70-80

OAK

Total Blocks: 2
Residential Blocks (1:1 Parking): 1.75
District Parking Blocks: 0.25
Single Family Detached Units: 5-15
Single Family Attached Units: 20-30
Multifamily Units: 45-55

LINCOLN

Total Blocks: 1
Residential Blocks (1:1 Parking): 0.85
District Parking Blocks: 0.15
Single Family Detached Units: 2-5
Single Family Attached Units: 10-15
Multifamily Units: 30-40

Neighborhood B contains about two equivalent “remaining” blocks, shown as the white shaded blocks in the plan. In B, these blocks are designated as “remaining” based on their surrounding topography and their peripheral location in the neighborhood. These blocks provide the flexibility to accommodate additional housing units or absorb changes in the development plan based on new information.

NEIGHBORHOOD “B”

Nestled into the hillsides, Neighborhood B feels like a small community but benefits from proximity to Neighborhoods A and C.

Neighborhood B is hugged by oaky hillsides. It is the smallest of the neighborhoods, with just a small amount of retail and a transit stop at its modest core, but is in close proximity to the mixed-use cores of neighborhoods A and C. It looks over the riparian corridor of Slate Creek and is connected to the rest of Brown Ranch by the trail network through the park.

NEIGHBORHOOD “C” PLAN

Neighborhood C sits atop the main crest of the site, with gently rolling hills dropping east and west towards the two primary parks on either side.

The neighborhood includes an east-west neighborhood core with eight and a half residential mixed-use Lincoln blocks, 11 Oak blocks, and five and a half Pine blocks. A centrally-located transit stop that serves the neighborhood is located adjacent to the mixed-use zone. The neighborhood is surrounded by a perimeter trail that connects directly to the Slate Creek corridor, multimodal trail, and both community parks. To fulfill the program and demand at the density mixes shown, neighborhood C contains about 1,070 total units.

PINE

Total Blocks: 5.5
Residential Blocks (1:1 Parking): 5
District Parking Blocks: 0.5
Single Family Detached Units: 60-70
Single Family Attached Units: 40-50
Multifamily Units: 55-65

OAK

Total Blocks: 11
Residential Blocks (1:1 Parking): 9.5
District Parking Blocks: 1.5
Single Family Detached Units: 60-70
Single Family Attached Units: 110-130
Multifamily Units: 265-285

LINCOLN

Total Blocks: 8.5
Residential Blocks (1:1 Parking): 7.25
District Parking Blocks: 1.25
Single Family Detached Units: 10-20
Single Family Attached Units: 100-120
Multifamily Units: 300-320

Neighborhood C contains approximately 12 equivalent “remaining” blocks, shown as the white shaded blocks in the plan. In C, these blocks are marked as “remaining” based on their surrounding topography and their peripheral location in the neighborhood. They provide the flexibility to accommodate additional housing units or absorb changes in the development plan based on new information.

NEIGHBORHOOD “C”

The heart of Brown Ranch is a pedestrian-centered environment connected to the history of the site.

Neighborhood C occupies the center of the Brown Ranch. It it the largest neighborhood at Brown Ranch and accordingly includes a robust mixed-use core and the proposed school site. The north-south greenways connect the northern open space with the multi-use trail for a robust bike and pedestrian network connecting residents to nature and neighbors. The Log Barn is featured as a community space in the natural park to the east and links Brown Ranch to its history.

NEIGHBORHOOD “D” PLAN

Neighborhood D sits on the gently rolling hills along the far western edge of the site, off of County Road 42.

The neighborhood includes a linear neighborhood core with approximately five residential mixed-use Lincoln blocks, three Oak blocks, and three and a half Pine blocks. A transit stop is centrally located adjacent to the mixed-use zone o connect the neigborhood. The neighborhood is surrounded by a perimeter trail and connects directly to a community park, the multimodal trail, and County Road 42. To meet program and demand goals at the density mixes shown, Neighborhood C contains about 500 total units.

PINE

Total Blocks: 3.5
Residential Blocks (1:1 Parking): 3.25
District Parking Blocks: 0.25
Single Family Detached Units: 35-45
Single Family Attached Units: 25-35
Multifamily Units: 35-45

OAK

Total Blocks: 3
Residential Blocks (1:1 Parking): 2.5
District Parking Blocks: 0.5
Single Family Detached Units: 15-25
Single Family Attached Units: 30-40
Multifamily Units: 75-85

LINCOLN

Total Blocks: 5.25
Residential Blocks (1:1 Parking): 4.5
District Parking Blocks: 0.75
Single Family Detached Units: 5-15
Single Family Attached Units: 60-70
Multifamily Units: 180-200

Neighborhood D contains approximately nine equivalent “remaining” blocks, shown as the white shaded blocks in the plan. In D, these blocks are marked as “remaining” based on their surrounding topography, peripheral location in the neighborhood, or potential wildfire management setbacks. These blocks provide the flexibility to accommodate additional housing units or absorb changes in the development plan based on new information.

NEIGHBORHOOD “D”

Perched on a low slope hillside, Neighborhood D provides mountain views and is surrounded by parks.

Neighborhood D is easily accessible from County Road 42, and surrounded by parkland on two sides. The east-west roads provide unobstructed views to the mountainscape in the distance, while the north-south greenways connect residents to the hilltop park to the south, with views over the Yampa River and beyond. Neighborhood D has a small mixed-use core easily accessible to Silver Spur neighbors. The multi-use trail links Neighborhood D to the rest of Brown Ranch, including the larger mixed-use core of Neighborhood C in one direction, and to the Sleeping Giant School in the other.

NEIGHBORHOOD “A” EXAMPLE PLAN

This drawing depicts one approach to site planning for Neighborhood A. The town square located in the center of the neighborhood could serve as a place for farmers markets or other community gatherings. Retail, live-work, or community services spaces with housing above line the main east-west street, creating a vibrant corridor through the neighborhood. The larger buildings are focused in the center of the neighborhood and the scale tapers to fourplex and eightplex single-family attacched homes as it approaches the edge of the Overlook neighborhood.

The large park is located immediately at the entry to the neighborhood, both to serve the neighboring communities, and to align with the district stormwater  approach that uses lowland park space as overflow during storm surges.

The plan assumes that one level of structured parking below the mixed-use buildings will provide one parking space per unit. These garages could be partially below grade with retail uses and stoops lining the edge of the garages to be more cost effective. Additional parking is provided in clustered surface lots which could be developed for housing at a future date. Carports covered with photovoltaic panels can support the sustainable energy goals for Brown Ranch.

Entering Brown Ranch

Aerial view of Neighborhood A. A mix of roof forms and approaches to building layout provide a rich texture and pedestrian scale to the neighborhood.

VIBRANT, ACTIVE STREETS

The four neighborhoods of Brown Ranch are linked together by open space, trails, and a mobility system that encourages pedestrian connectivity. Each  neighborhood includes a “Mixed-Use Village Core” that serves as the heart of the community. The goal of these Neighborhood Core Streets is to support a vibrant, safe, healthy, and equitable community life.

The Mixed-Use Village Core provides a diversity of housing types and creates a central location for neighborhood services.

Active uses along the Village Core street encourage interaction between pedestrians and the uses within the building.

Active uses include – but are not limited to – retail, restaurants, bars and pubs, post offices, banks, personal services, offices, residential lobbies, and the work portion of a work/live unit. It also includes leasing offices and amenities provided in  connection with residential uses, such as fitness rooms and amenity areas.

4.3 Mobility

GUIDING PRINCIPLES

PEOPLE FIRST

Design for people before cars by prioritizing safe and comfortable pedestrian, bike, and transit infrastructure.

  • Locate a transit stop or hub within a 1/2 mile of all homes
  • Implement a gridded street network to reduce street widths and improve walkability.
  • Provide designated bike lanes throughout the neighborhoods, connected to the multimodal trail.
  • Provide a network of pedestrian-focused spaces (greenways) that connect to the multimodal trail.

ACCESS

Ensure safe and clear access throughout the neighborhood for people with a range of physical, visual, and auditory abilities.

  • Minimize street slopes where possible to accommodate a range of physical abilities.
  • Prioritize 5% maximum slope in neighborhood centers, especially areas adjacent to transit stops.
  • Provide accessible pedestrian signals at intersections within neighborhood centers.
  • Provide a multi-modal trail that is a maximum of 5% slope and provide wayfinding maps to identify routes through the community that are 5% or less, to the greatest extent possible.

CONNECTIVITY

Provide easy and intuitive connections from all homes to the neighborhood centers, school site, transit stops, multi-modal trail, and parks and open spaces.

  • Use a grid network to facilitate easy connections from all homes, and create multiple options for routes.
  • Distribute neighborhood centers, transit stops, and parks to allow access within 1/4 mile from all homes.
  • Create shared streets, or woonerfs,* along key edges that front community park space.

*woonerf: a Dutch term which means a circulation area shared by pedestrians, wheeled users, and vehicles, and accessible to surrounding uses.

EDGES

Create a trail network along the perimeter of development areas to navigate wildlandurban interfaces.

  • Provide a fire-break between undeveloped areas and housing for fire fighting management.
  • Create a space for people to visually connect to nature while protecting wildlife habitat.
  • Provide a gradual, flexible transition from the grid of the developed portion of the site to the undeveloped, natural portion of the site.

BIKE & PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION NETWORK

A well-connected walking and biking network reduces the distances people have to travel to reach their destinations and increases the options for routes of travel, reducing reliance on vehicles.

The bike and pedestrian network for Brown Ranch is robust and is intended to prioritize safe, convenient, and well-maintained biking and walking opportunities for all ages and ability levels. A primary component of the network is the multi-modal trail that will connect to the existing Yampa River Core Trail. The trail should be maintained year round to maximize its role in offsetting vehicle use. The secondary trails include pedestrian paths in a series of greenways running  north-south through the site, as well as trails at the edges of the site and through portions of the open space. Dedicated bike lanes are provided on the primary roadways through the site, while the neighborhood streets are designed as slow streets to allow bikes and cars to share the space safely.