The Brown Ranch Community Development Plan

Designed by the community, for the community.

Appendix

LINKS TO RELATED DOCUMENTS

BROWN RANCH COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN SUMMARY

The Brown Ranch Community Development Summary is a brief explanation of the project contained in this document. It is intended as an overview for those  interested in the highlights of the plan, and is composed of several of the pages included in this document.

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT RECORDINGS

Many of the Community Engagement Meetings were recorded, including the first large format community meetings in January and October of 2022, and the  Focus Team meetings that occurred in February, March and April of 2022.

These can be found at the following link: https://www.youtube.com/@brownranch2264

Meeting minutes can be found on the Brown Ranch web site, and can be accessed through the following link: https://brownranchsteamboat.org/category/focus-team-updates/

EXISTING DOCUMENT REVIEW

The first step for the technical team to engage with the Brown Ranch Development Plan was to review the existing documentation that could inform or impact the  community plan. This included review of existing technical documents about the site from previous proposals (soils conditions, habitat, wetlands, property  boundary and easement information, traffic information, etc.), local and regional initiatives around climate, health equity, and land use, and specific zoning and  other design requirements tied to various area plans and the Community Development Plan.

Summaries of these existing documents and their relationship to the Brown Ranch Development Plan are available through the following link:

https://brownranchsteamboat.org/2022/02/18/existing-documents-summary/

WILDFIRE REPORT

Increasingly, planning for wildfires is critical for any development in the mountain west. The Brown Ranch Development Plan is informed by the technical analysis  provided by Community Wildfire Planning Center, and includes setbacks suggested by this team to help mitigate the spread of wildfire through the  community.

The full report produced by Community Wildfire Planning Center can be found on the Brown Ranch web site through the following link: https://brownranchsteamboat.org/2022/11/04/brown-ranch-community-development-plan-2022/

HEALTH EQUITY ACTION PLAN

The Health Equity Action Plan provides a detailed, holistic roadmap towards implementing the Health Equity Initiative’s goals and strategies.

The Health Equity  Action Plan can be found on the Brown Ranch website through the following link: https://brownranchsteamboat.org/2022/11/04/brown-ranch-community-developmentplan-2022/

NEIGHBORHOOD VIEWS KEY MAP

This map serves as a key for the neighborhood aerial views that are distributed throughout the document, as well as the overall aerial of the proposed design for  the site. Small key maps are provided on the images themselves, but this map consolidates all of the view orientations into one place, on the more detailed site  plan, for supplemental orientation.

ROUTT COUNTY AREA MEDIAN INCOME CHARTS

Each year, the Colorado Housing Finance Authority (CHFA) establishes rent limits for housing developments using the Low Income Housing Tax Credit program  (LIHTC) and CHFA Multifamily Loans. The limits are based on HUD’s Multifamily Tax Subsidy Program income limits, and adjusted by county. These programs will be used to help build a large number of rental homes at Brown Ranch, in particular the multi-family apartments and possibly some of the townhouse or single- family attached homes.

Using the table below, families can predict the approximate rent for their home, based on their household income.

A family can determine what their AMI is by looking at household income and size on the right of the table. Based on this income, the maximum rent for each unit type can be found on the left side of the table.

It should be noted that 2021 AMI charts were the basis for analysis of the Brown Ranch Community Development Plan as the 2022 charts were not available at the time of analysis.

The 2021 AMI chart can be found at the following link: https://www.chfainfo.com/getattachment/d5f37b0d-d2bb-4176-a641-133977e4a199/2021-Rent-and-income-limits.pdf

HOUSING TYPOLOGIES

APARTMENTS & CONDOMINUMS, STACKED FLATS, LIVE-WORK & MIXED USE BUILDINGS

SINGLE-FAMILY ATTACHED

SINGLE-FAMILY DETACHED

ACCESSORY DWELLING UNIT

APARTMENTS & CONDOMINUMS, STACKED FLATES, LIVE-WORK & MIXED USE BUILDINGS

Apartment and Condo buildings of stacked flats are the most efficient building typology for multi-family and mixed use buildings. This building type offers the flexibility for a different ground floor, allowing for mixed-use buildings and live-work units.

This is suggested as the primary building type for Neighborhood A,  and should be considered for all of the other neighborhoods as well, particularly in the mixed-use village cores. When elevators are provided, this building type  provides a high level of flexibility to accommodate aging in place and multi-generational households.

Some considerations to maximize the flexibility of this type  over time, and to address some of the health equity goals:

• Design for the flexibility to join 2 units into one larger unit.

• Locate studio units adjacent to 2 or 3 bedroom units.

• Design party walls to allow future penetrations in party walls

• Provide an alternate unit design for the combined unit and include this in the maintenance and operations manual for the owner at construction close out.

• Design for small-family in home day care

• Locate a percentage of the units adjacent to an open space that can be partitioned off for child care use. This could be on a podium courtyard or a side or rear- yard setback if security considerations can be addressed.

• Provide larger than normal living room area to accommodate child-care accessories as well as basic residential furnishings.

SINGLE-FAMILY ATTACHED

Single-Family Attached includes a range of housing typologies, including townhouses, bungalow courtyard housing, or stacked flats in a duplex, four-plex, eight- plex or more. These building types provide many of the advantages of single-family housing such as direct access to the outside, private open-space potential, and  easy storage for bikes, wagons, strollers, or other equipment.

However, single family attached are significantly more efficient than a detached home. They use less  land area due to fewer setbacks, and they often share foundations and infrastructure making. Single-family attached homes are a critical part of meeting the Brown  Ranch goals tied to affordability and sustainability, while still allowing for a single-family home experience.

SINGLE-FAMILY DETACHED

Single-Family Detached homes at Brown Ranch will be designed to support the larger community goal for a vibrant, active, and walkable community. The lots will be large enough to allow for a small yard and alley-accessed garage with an ADU, typically around 35’ x 100’. This is smaller than some of the recent single-family  home developments, but compatible with the walkable neighborhood feel of Old Town Steamboat Springs.

The specific architecture will be determined at a later date, but all homes will be designed with sustainability in mind. Balancing daylighting with heat gain and  loss should inform the building skin. Maximizing potential for energy production with solar panels should inform the roof lines. Minimizing both impermeable  surfaces and irrigation water use should inform the site design.

ACCESSORY DWELLING UNIT

Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) should be considered at every single-family detached parcel to maximize flexibility and affordability. Particular attention will  need to be paid to how ADUs work with the stewardship criteria to ensure that they support the affordability goals of the project and do not become short-term  rentals.

ADUs could be considered as a unit over a garage, or as a stand-alone shed. In either case, these small units could be delivered as part of a pre-fabricated  system to minimize construction time and cost.

ADUs support the health equity goals by mixing small, affordable homes in with larger more expensive homes.

LANDSCAPE FRONTAGE STUDIES

The interface between building edges and landscape should be thoughtfully designed with a public edge. A sidewalk, trail, woonerf, or road provide public access while also creating an edge for fire protection. These studies explore the interaction between the edge of the greenways and open space with different edge  conditions.

WEAVE

Natural landscapes weave into the green connectors and into the residential areas.

Weave Visual

PUNCTURE

Urban landscape punctuates the natural open space, making it a terminus / destination gathering area.

Puncture Visual

STITCH

Gradient of urban landscapes from more residential areas blending with the natural landscapes of the multimodal trail open space.

Stitch Visual

MOBILITY & THE GRID STRUCTURE

Gridded networks support pedestrian safety and community connectivity in several ways.

  • Grids provide duplicate routes which allow for narrower streets.
  • Narrow streets slow traffic naturally where speed bumps and other mitigations are needed to slow traffic on wider streets.
  • Grids provide more direct routes, allowing for more destinations to be accessed by walking or biking.
Weave Visual

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS ANNEXATION FLOW CHART

Weave Visual

Notes:

  1. Annexation Agreement must be executed prior to Second Reading of Annexation Ordinance.
  2. Annexation Ordinance satisfies both statutory and CDC process requirements.
  3. Earliest point in the Annexation process that Preliminary Plat process can begin.
  4. Earliest point in the Annexation process that Preliminary Plat can be approved.

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS DEVELOPMENT PERMIT FLOW CHART

Weave Visual

Note:

  1. Earliest point in the process that construction of infrastructure can begin.